Picture Heavy Weekend: Skirt Sewing and yummy food making!

A short time after she got back from her honeymoon, Daphna and I got together for a well-planned-ahead weekend of crafting and fooding. She’s recently received an awesome gift for her wedding – a shiny new sewing machine, and ever since I got her hooked on Pinterest we’ve both been drooling over glorious recipes we want to try. And so I drove up to her boyfriend husband’s and hers lovely apartment in Jerusalem for 3 packed days.

On the menu:

Four onions quiche (In Hebrew, sorry. Google Translate is your somewhat illiterate friend)

– Amazing Tabouli salad (Daphna’s family’s recipe. Gotta ask her for that one)

Giant chocolate chip cookie baked in a skillet for dessert

Lemon Ricotta pancakes with black currant sauce for saturday morning breakfast (We couldn’t find blueberries, so – black currants.)

We started Friday morning with fabric shopping downtown and brunch in this cafe:

Jerusalem brunch Tmol Shilshom

Then we went to the market to buy groceries for all the upcoming cooking. It’s crazy busy on Fridays but I got a few good shots (Not around any of the veggies or greens we bought because then we were busy trying to purchase, but of market noms that were everywhere):

Jerusalem market food

When we got home we rested a bit and then started preparing dinner.

Four onions quiche Bazek Alim

The quiche was awesome and the salad was just so so good. I cannot explain to you how good the salad was for me, who usually doesn’t like too much green stuff. It was just light and lemony and yum, and it offset the heaviness of everything else and made us feel less guilty about all the butter.

Tabouli Salad

We’ve been fantasizing about the giant chocolate chip cookie all week, and it was amazing. We “accidentally” used too much chocolate and it was melty and crazy and so good with ice cream. We broke down after about a third of it.

Chocolate chip chunks cookie

Skillet baked giant chocolate chip cookie

Skillet baked giant chocolate chip cookie

After all this we just had to crash on the sofa for a while, look at beautiful wedding photos (ahem) and watch my favorite brothers living Tuesday over and over:

Supernatural Winchesters

(isn’t Daphna’s apartment lovely? look! mini succulents!)

On Saturday morning we made this, and it was as yummy as it looks:

Ricotta lemon black currant pancakes

And then after all the food it was time to get to work!

Sewing machine

We made skirts! We used this tutorial from iCandy Handmade, which adapts MADE‘s tutorial for jersey fabric. Still, the fabric was sort of medium weight and we ended up with a larger opening than we wanted because of its weight, so we shaved off a few inches more from the waistband and gathered the skirt. I really like how it turned out!

Jersey circle skirts sewing

The new sewing machine was lovely and I’m sure Daphna’s going to make beautiful things with it. It was so different from mine – my grandma’s old Singer from the 70’s. The weekend got me itching to go back to sewing so I pulled it out and started working on a blouse using the awesome fabric I got in Jerusalem. It will be ready soon and I’ll be able to show it off here :)

So that was that, it was amazing and fun and a bit tiring. Many thanks to Daphna and Yuval for hosting and keeping me around for so long and putting up with the mess :D It was a great way to celebrate the end of summer break! and we’ll definitely have to do this again, there are many more outrageously fattening recipes on Pinterest.

50’s textile is funky

Tiny disclaimer – This is the first time since I began studying design that I stumble upon a bit of history that inspires me to write about here. Please bear with me as I haven’t fully researched the subject, I just did a very short and quick paper on it so this is more ‘oh look at the pretty!’ than an actual study in textile history.

In one of the new classes of the semester everyone had to pick one word with personal meaning, and the teacher gave each of us a different assignment based on what we chose. I chose “London”, and my assignment was to research women textile designers in 50’s era London. I didn’t have a lot of time so I didn’t hit the books (I mainly hit the search button on Google..) but I did use this wonderful set of pattern books from the V&A, a gift from my lovely coworkers. It was so much fun turning to my own private little library for school work, and it made for a quick source of photos as each of the books comes with a cd of jpegs – handy!

50’s era prints were bold, vibrant and fun, epitomized in the work of the most popular designer of the time, Lucienne Day. I love how the influence of modern art  is so apparent in her designs, specifically Joan Miró’s, one of my favorite artists. Looking at her fabric designs (that were mostly used for furniture) is uplifting. She really made home textiles an affordable form of art. A number of prominent women designers worked and transformed the field alongside her, and I briefly touched upon works by Jacqueline Groag, Mary White and Hilda Durkin in my paper.

Here are some of my favorites:

Calyx, 1951, Lucienne Day's most famous and sought after design

Calyx, 1951, Lucienne Day’s most famous and sought after design

Herb Anatomy, Lucienne day/Heal's, 1956

Herb Anatomy, Lucienne day/Heal’s, 1956 – So Miró-ish!

Coppice, Mary White/Heal's 1954

Coppice, Mary White/Heal’s 1954

Jacqueline Groag/David Whitehead, 1952

Jacqueline Groag/David Whitehead, 1952

Nightstand Makeover: Fabric Decoupage

I’ve got a full week of total freedom, since the last exam finished and till the new semester begins. It took me a few days of staring at the wall, watching Doctor Who and eating cookies to get back into crafty DIY mode. The apartment has seen no improvements since school began so now it’s time to prettify it a little.

First stop: this piece of salvaged furniture a neighbor threw out, which I’ve been using as a nightstand.

nightstand makeover before_1

There wasn’t much to do with the sunken top, but a few drops of carpenters glue helped strengthen the corners.

And then – the make over. All it took was paint (left over from a school assignment – yay for fully exploiting existing resources!), Mod Podge (Gloss-Lustre) and cotton fabric for the drawers.

nightstand make over after_1

This was the first time I did decoupage with fabric and I used many tips from this tutorial from Lolie’s Abode.

The steps for decoupage were as follows:

1. I traced around the drawer tops and cut the fabric with a few cm extra on every side. I made sure the placement was alright for the three drawers.

2. I found it especially helpful to spread a thin layer of Mod Podge on the cut fabric and letting it dry before gluing it to the drawers. The Mod Podge stiffens the fabric and makes it easier to work with. I also made sure I chose a thick non-transparent fabric to begin with so I wouldn’t have issues with the wood showing beneath it. It didn’t bubble at all which was a relief. On the contrary, the Mod Podge made all the creases and lines disappear and I didn’t have to feel guilty about not ironing the fabric first.

3. I used Mod Podge to glue the fabric onto the top of the drawer first and let it dry, then cut around the excess fabric to leave only a thin border, just enough to go over the edges.

4. I glued around the corners and the back one side after the other, folding the corners as neatly as possible. As a first project, I would recommend you don’t do as I did, and pick a rectangular surface with straight lines. The curved part of the drawer was tricky. I let go of any hope of the fabric looking nice and neat on the inside. I clipped the fabric so it would stretch better, and used my fingers a lot to pull and stretch it over the curve. I think all in all I did nicely but it was the trickiest part of an otherwise easy project.

5. I spread another layer of Mod Podge over the fabric front and edges (over the corner folds especially) to seal it. As I said my fabric didn’t bubble at all so I didn’t need any extra layers to smooth it out and once was enough. I also didn’t sand it afterwards. I’m very pleased with the finish. I think the fabric choice is crucial here so if you use a sturdy cotton fabric you’d be okay.

I only wish I’d dealt with the sunken top but otherwise I’m very happy. It was a poorly built little piece of furniture to begin with, one of those things people throw out and you just collect for your student apartment, but now it’s brighter and happier and it’s something I made, so I’m very fond of it.

I hope to get some more DIY done before the end of the week. And next week – new semester, new classes! I’m excited. Mostly because we’re going to have an embroidery class and I’m very much into embroidery and already have all the materials and tools. So watch this space for more school madness. Remember to sign up for updates via email or RSS down here at the bottom of the page or follow me on Pinterest!